Program Regulations

Section 1

Main Content

General regulations concerning admission and advanced degrees in the Graduate College of the University of Illinois are set forth in A Handbook for Graduate Students and Advisers which, along with other information and forms, can be accessed at http://www.grad.illinois.edu.  Graduate students in philosophy are expected to be familiar with these, as well as with the special regulations set forth below.

The regulations set forth here apply to all students entering the Graduate Program in Philosophy beginning with the fall semester of 2009.  Students already in the Program at this time have the option of completing their work according to the regulations in effect before this dateor transferring to the current ones.

Preparatory Work

Each student should have had (1) a course in symbolic logic, and (2) general courses in the history of ancient and early modern philosophy (dealing with the main figures in each period), and should also have done some course work in such central areas of philosophical inquiry as ethics and the theory of knowledge.Students entering the doctoral program with deficiencies in either or both of the first two areas indicated will be required to remedy them by taking Philosophy 202 (Symbolic Logic), Philosophy 203 (Ancient Philosophy), and/or Philosophy 206 (Early Modern Philosophy), depending upon their particular deficiencies. These courses do not carry graduate credit, and will not be counted toward the satisfaction of course and hour requirements in the graduate program; and students taking them to remedy deficiencies must receive grades of B or higher in them.Entering students in the doctoral program who have not previously done course work in ethics and/or theory of knowledge will be expected to take Philosophy 421 (Ethical Theories) and/or Philosophy 430 (Theory of Knowledge) early in their graduate studies.

Credit for Graduate Coursework Done at Other Institutions

Students who enter the philosophy Ph.D. program after having already earned an M.A. in philosophy from another institution may petition for a transfer of up to 32 hours of credit (the equivalent of 8 of our graduate courses) toward the Ph.D., reducing the number of hours of credit needed to be admitted to Stages II and III of the PhD program accordingly.The student seeking such a transfer of credit should provide to the Admissions Committee a statement summarizing the content of the courses, including texts and readings, number of class hours per week, and final grade.The Admissions Committee can provide a preliminary assessment of whether such transfer of credit is likely to be authorized.Such a transfer of credit will reduce the years the student may expect to receive financial aid from the Department from 5 to 4 and will accelerate the timetable to complete the requirements described below by 1 year.In general, transfer of credit is not finally approved until a student has completed one term in residence.

Students who enter the Ph.D. programwithouthaving completed an M.A. in philosophy from another institution but who have completed some post-undergraduate coursework can also petition for a transfer of credit. In this case no more than 12 hours of transfer credit (3 graduate courses) will be allowed.Such transfers of credit will have no impact on continuation of financial aid.Any course that has been used to satisfy degree requirements elsewhere cannot be transferred (unless an MA degree is offered to satisfy the first stage of the program as in the case above).

The typical procedure for this latter type of transfer of credit involves petitioning the department with the aid of an advisor. Such petitions may be made to the Director of Graduate Studiesafterone semester of residence. The petitioner should attach to his/her petition a statement summarizing the content of the courses, including texts and readings, number of class hours per week, and final grade.If a student is judged, on the basis of his/her work here, to need more credit hours in our program than he/she would be required to take if the petition were granted, his/her petition may be denied, in whole or in part, or the decision may be postponed.

The Degree of Master of Arts

Students may earn an M.A. degree in philosophy by completing one full year of residence studying philosophy at this University; accumulating 32 hours of graduate credit (8 graduate courses), at least 24 of which are earned in regularly scheduled classes or seminars under the PHIL course rubric, and at least 12 of which are at the 500-level (in accordance with Graduate College regulations); submitting a substantial essay; and passing an oral examination on this essay conducted by a committee (usually consisting of the student’s advisor and one other member of the Philosophy faculty) appointed by the Head of the Department. The M.A. degree earned in this way is normally a terminal degree. Students who do not pass the second-year review required for admission to the Second Stage of the program (see below) can also earn an M.A. degree in this way. Students in the Department’s Ph.D. program who are denied admission to its Second Stage as well as students in good standing who wish to obtain the master’s degree prior to admission to the Third Stage, may receive an M.A. by satisfying these same criteria; i.e., by having accumulated 32 hours of graduate credit (8 graduate courses), at least 24 of which were earned in regularly scheduled classes or seminars under the PHIL course rubric, and at least 12 of which were at the 500-level; submitting a substantial essay; and passing an oral examination on this essay conducted by a committee appointed by the Head of the Department. If the student fails the preliminary exam, the committee may decide that the dissertation proposal and preliminary examination serve as the aforementioned substantial essay and oral examination for an M.A.

Students who are passed into the Third Stage of the Ph.D. program will be granted an M.A. automatically.

As per Graduate College regulations, students who entered the program with an M.A. in philosophy cannot obtain an additional M.A. in philosophy from UIUC.

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: The Three Stages of the Program

The Graduate College Handbook distinguishes the following three Stages in the program for the Ph.D.:

The First Stage is completed when a student has earned 32 hours of graduate credit (8 graduate courses) (including any courses approved for transfer of credit) and has been formally admitted to the Second Stage by the Department (via the Second-Year Review, see below).

The Second Stage is completed when a student has earned 32 additional hours of graduate credit (8 additional graduate courses), has satisfied the Course Distribution, Language, and Symbolic Logic requirements, has passed the Preliminary Examination, and has fulfilled any extra-departmental minor course requirements undertaken voluntarily (see below, “Extra Departmental Minors”), (The Philosophy Department requires that the Distribution, Language, and Symbolic Logic requirements be satisfied before it will certify to the Graduate College that a student has passed the Preliminary Examination.)

The Third Stage is devoted to research and seminars (32 additional hours--8 additional graduate courses, including the dissertation writing seminar each term and a 2-hour seminar participation each year), the preparation of a dissertation, and the final (Doctoral Oral) examination.

For each stage of the program, the Department reserves the right to require that a student earn additional hours of graduate credit beyond the minimum requirements listed here.

Graduate Advisers

Throughout the work for the Ph.D. –in selecting courses, preparing for the Preliminary Examination, choosing a dissertation topic and writing the dissertation – a student is under the direction of a graduate adviser.Normally the adviser is a member of the graduate faculty chosen by the student, subject to the agreement of the faculty member and the approval of the Department’s Director of Graduate Studies.The Director of Graduate Studies serves as temporary adviser to new students until they select regular advisers.

As a student’s work progresses, it will sometimes be the case that a change of adviser is desirable.Such changes can be made with the aid and approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.A simple form must be filed with the Department secretary in order to complete this process.

Regulations of the Graduate College require that the work of each student in the Third Stage of the program be under the direction of a member of the faculty authorized by the College to direct doctoral dissertations.Upon entering this Stage of the program the first task of the student is to secure the agreement of an adviser authorized for this purpose.Registration for further work in the program is not permitted until this has been done.

Extra-Departmental Minors

Beyond demonstrating competence through the Preliminary Examination, the student isnotrequired to have a minor field of study either within or outside the Department.However, where a student’s advanced study of philosophy would be strengthened by the inclusion of work in a related field, the student may be advised or permitted to offer work outside the Department in partial satisfaction of the course requirements for the Ph. D. degree.The amount of such work is limited to 8 hours (2 graduate courses), unless the student wishes the work to count as anextra-departmental minor.Then the minimum work accepted is 8 hours (2 graduate courses), and the maximum is 16 (4 graduate courses).Within these limitations, the specific amount and nature of work required for an extra-departmental minor will be determined by the department or division concerned, subject to the approval of the student’s Department Advisor and of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Adviser in Extra-Departmental Minor:To ensure proper cohesion and purpose in work counted toward an extra-departmental minor, each candidate pursuing such a minor must secure a member of the graduate faculty in the chosen field to supervise the student’s work and, at its completion, to certify to the Philosophy Department that the requirements for a minor in that field have been satisfied.A student wishing to pursue an extra-departmental minor is normally expected to choose the minor field and secure an adviser in that field by the time the student completes the First Stage.

Admission to the Second Stage

On or before the completion of the First Stage of work in the program, the student’s qualifications for further work are examined. Recommendations on this matter are made to the Department by the Graduate Program Committee. When a student has completed 32 hours of work (8 graduate courses), or has been in residence three semesters, whichever comes first, the student’s adviser prepares for the Committee a report on the student’s progress to date. On the basis of this report and other available evidence, including evidence of good performance in teaching duties (except in the rare case in which the student has not been required to do any teaching) the Committee makes a recommendation to the Department on the question of whether the student should be advanced in the program or continued in the program without advancement (deferring the decision to a later date). The recommendation from the Committee will be submitted to the department at the end of the spring semester, and voted upon early in the following Fall semester. The Department may, if it wishes, set an examination, or require that the student complete certain special work, before a final decision is made.

The qualifications of transfer students who have earned an M.A. in philosophy from another school and who wish to enter the program in the Second Stage are assessed in an advisory and preliminary way by the Committee and on Admission and Financial Aid. Final determination is made, however, by the Graduate Program Committee and confirmed by the Department in the manner described above. This will normally occur during the second semester of study in the program. A student who enters the Second Stage in this way is not awarded an M.A. degree from this institution.

The Preliminary Examination

The following schedule and procedures for the Preliminary Examination are designed to help students choose a thesis topic, compile a bibliography of writings relevant to that topic, and formulate a fruitful dissertation proposal.The purpose of the Preliminary Examination itself (described in item 5 below) is to test the quality and promise of the student’s proposed dissertation project, to evaluate the quality of the student’s preliminary work on this project, and to determine whether the student is competent to carry out the planned research.

Typically the exam must be taken by the end of the student’s third year in the program.If a student enters with an M.A. from another institution and has been approved to have 32 hours of previous coursework count toward the Ph.D. degree here, then the exam must be taken by the end of the second year (and all other deadlines will be reduced by one year accordingly).

1.By the end of his or her second year in the Ph.D. program, a student will choose an area of specialization and find a member of the Graduate Faculty at UIUC with a ≥ 0% appointment in the Philosophy Department willing to serve as his or her Prelim Adviser. The Prelim Adviser will help the student formulate a thesis topic and compile a bibliography of writings relevant to that topic.Drafts of (a) and (d) below in (3) should be submitted to the Prelim Adviser at this point..

2.By the end of the Fall semester of the student’s third year, the student and his or her Prelim Adviser will find three additional faculty members willing to serve on the student’s Prelim Committee and begin working with these additional faculty members on various aspects of the student’s Dissertation Proposal, in preparation for the Preliminary Examination (on which, see [5] below).In accordance with Graduate College regulations, the Philosophy Department will recommend to the Graduate College that the Prelim Adviser, together with these three additional faculty members serve as the student’s Prelim Committee.(In addition to the membership requirements imposed by the Graduate College, which may be found at http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook/2/chapter6/committees-exams#prelim, the Philosophy Department requires that at least two members of the Prelim Committee be members of the Department’s regular faculty.) Drafts of (b) and (c) below in (3) should be submitted to the Prelim Adviser at this point.

3.No later than three weeks before the end of the Spring semester of the student’s third year, the student must submit a Dissertation Proposal that includes (a) a sketch of the dissertation project – the topic of the dissertation and envisaged themes, arguments, and conclusions insofar as these are known, (b) a substantial discussion of at least one of the themes or arguments of the dissertation project, (c) a discussion of the relevant philosophical literature and the relation of the proposed dissertation project to this literature, and (d) a selected but comprehensive bibliography of the relevant literature.The proposal must be at least 4500 words long (roughly 15 double-spaced pages) and no more than 9000 words long (roughly 30 double-spaced pages), not including the bibliography.It is expected that the student will work closely with his or her Adviser and other members of his or her Prelim Committee during Fall and the early parts of the Spring semester of the third year, so that by the time the Dissertation Proposal is submitted, the student will have discussed it with all members of his or her Prelim Committee.

4.A Ph.D. student who does not find a Prelim Adviser, form a Prelim Committee, or submit a Dissertation Proposal in accordance with the schedule above will not be making normal progress towards the Ph.D. degree.The consequences of failure to comply with the schedule will be determined on a case-by-case basis, and may well include loss of departmental financial support, or dismissal from the program.

5.Once the Dissertation Proposal is submitted, the Prelim Adviser will schedule a two-hour period during which all four members of the Prelim Committee will together conduct an oral examination on all components (a)-(d) of the student’s Dissertation Proposal.This will be the Prelim Examination, the purpose of which is to test the quality and promise of the student’s proposed dissertation project, to evaluate the quality of the student’s preliminary work on this project, and to determine whether the student is competent to carry out the planned research.The committee will not focus exclusively on parts (a) and (b) of the Dissertation Proposal, but will also ask questions about parts (c) and (d), including more general questions about philosophical issues that are fundamental to the proposed thesis and questions that test familiarity with basic literature in the field.

6.In accordance with the policies of the Graduate College (See A Handbook for Graduate Students and Advisees, Part VII, section 7), decisions of the Prelim Committee must be unanimous.If the student does not pass the Prelim Examination, the student’s Prelim Committee may either (a) Fail the candidate. A program may, but is not required to, grant the student another opportunity to take the examination after completing additional course work, independent study, or research, as recommended by the committee. However, if a second attempt is given, a new committee must be appointed by the Graduate College. The new committee may, but does not have to, consist of the same members as the original committee, or (b) Defer the decision. If this option is chosen: the same committee must re-examine the student, the second exam must occur within 180 calendar days of the date of first exam, and the outcome of the second exam must be pass or fail.

Course Distribution Requirement

Of the 64 hours of graduate course work (16 graduate courses) which must be earned for a student to be advanced to the Third Stage of the Ph.D. program, 8 hours must be earned in courses in the history of philosophy, 8 hours in courses in the areas of ethics and value theory (including social and political philosophy and aesthetics), and 8 hours in courses in the areas of metaphysics and epistemology (including philosophy of mind, language, and science).

At least 52 (13 graduate courses) of the 64 hours must be earned in regularly scheduled advanced 400-level courses and graduate seminars (500-level), and at least 20 (5 graduate courses) of the 64 hours must be earned in graduate seminars.A maximum of 12 (3 graduate courses) of these 64 hours may be earned in independent study courses.

Language Requirement

Every student must demonstrate competence in one of the four basic philosophical languages (French, German, Latin, or Greek) or else satisfy an alternative requirement (as described below), before advancing to the Third Stage of the program. In the case of French this may be done by passing FR 501 with a grade of B or better or by passing an examination administered by the Department of French. In the case of German this may be done by passing GER 501 with a grade of B or better or by passing an examination administered by the Department of German. In the case of Latin this may be done by passing with a grade of B or better any LAT course at the 300-, 400-, or 500-level (with the exception of LAT 471, 475, and 478). In the case of Greek this may be done by passing with a grade of B or better any GRK course at the 400- or 500-level (with the exception of GRK 403 and GRK 404). Alternatively students may pass a proficiency examination in Latin or Greek administered by the Department of the Classics, the form of which must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.

To substitute a language other than one of the basic four, a student must first obtain approval of his or her adviser and of the Graduate Program Committee. Such approval normally will be granted only where the language is directly relevant to the student’s work in philosophy.

The student may petition the Graduate Program Committee to replace the language requirement by an approved program of study in her or his area of research. This petition must include a written justification by the student or the advisor. If written by the student, the justification must be approved by the student’s advisor. This program of study should be deemed more useful to the student’s research than a study of one the philosophical languages. It may, for example, involve intensive study of specific methods that will greatly enhance the student’s research, such as scientific, mathematical, or statistical methods, or it may involve obtaining crucial knowledge of some field outside of philosophy, such as concentrated studies in law, psychology, or religion.

 

Symbolic Logic Requirement

Students in the Ph.D. Program must also satisfy a Symbolic Logic requirement.This requirement may be satisfied by passing with a grade of B or better in an appropriate course in symbolic logic (e.g., Philosophy 453 or 454) or by passing a proficiency examination in the same subject. Completion of the Symbolic Logic Requirement is necessary for the satisfaction of the Preliminary Examination Requirement and, thus, for admission to the Third Stage of the program.

Third Stage of the Program

Upon earning 64 hours of credit, passing the Preliminary Examination, and completing the Course Distribution, Language, and Symbolic Logic requirements, the student is admitted to the Third Stage, which is the dissertation-writing stage of the Ph.D. program.Students should begin the Third Stage no later than the beginning of their seventh semester of graduate study in philosophy.

When the requirements for entering the Third Stage have been substantially completed by the student, the Head of the Department in consultation with the student and the Director of Graduate Studies will appoint a Doctoral Committee. This committee must include at least two current members of the Department’s regular faculty and have as its Chair a member of the Graduate Faculty at UIUC with a ≥ 0% appointment in Philosophy at the time of the committee’s initial appointment. It is the responsibility of the Doctoral Committee to ensure that the student has a specialist’s knowledge of the general area in which the student’s dissertation topic falls, and to supervise the student’s preparation of the dissertation.The Doctoral Committee will hold the Initial Meeting with the student within 30 days of its appointment to discuss with the student the plans for the dissertation.The student will be expected at this meeting to present his or her thesis proposal and bibliography, updated and revised in light of comments the student received at his or her prelim exam and in subsequent consultations with his or her advisers.When the Preliminary Examination Committee and the Doctoral Committee have the same members, this meeting can be waived if the Preliminary Examination was passed without any reservations.

Within one semester of the Initial Meeting, there will be a formal Progress Meeting of student and Doctoral Committee to discuss the student’s work.At a reasonable time prior to the Progress Meeting, the student is expected to give each member of the committee a draft of a substantial portion of the thesis (at least one chapter, different from the “substantial discussion” section of the Preliminary Exam Proposal).

Immediately following the Initial Meeting and the Progress Meeting, it is the responsibility of the Chair of the Doctoral Committee to make a brief written report of the student’s progress to the Director of Graduate Studies.These reports will become a part of the student’s permanent file.The student and Doctoral Committee may elect to hold additional meetings. In addition, students should seek the advice of their advisers and doctoral committees at every stage of the work on the dissertation.

The final Doctoral Oral Examination will be held upon completion of the dissertation to determine whether the student shall be certified to the Graduate College for the award of the Ph.D. For this purpose, a Final Examination Committee will be appointed by the Head of the Department in consultation with the student and the Director of Graduate Studies. The composition of this committee will normally be identical to that of the Doctoral Committee, allowing for any changes either requested by the student or necessitated by a change in status of its members.In addition to the membership requirements imposed by the Graduate College, which may be found at http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook/2/chapter6/committees-exams#FinalExams, the Philosophy Department requires that the Final Examination Committee include at least two current members of the Department’s regular faculty.

Additional Third-Stage Requirements:  During the Third Stage, students are required to enroll in a dissertation writing seminar each term, to be offered by different members of the faculty.In addition, students will be required to enroll in one seminar per year for 2 hours of credit, to be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.For students enrolled only for 2-hours credit, the term paper requirement of the seminar will be waived, though active participation in the seminar discussion will be expected and a seminar presentation may also be required   

The Doctoral Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation in philosophy is an extended piece of written work that demonstrates the student’s ability to do independent research and tocontributeto the discussions of philosophers.The dissertation should show that the student has a specialist’s knowledge of a topic of significance to philosophy and the ability to say something about the topic of importance to other specialists in the same area.

Dissertations are generally from 150 to 250 pages in length, but a shorter or a longer work might in some cases be appropriate.A dissertation is usually either an extended discussion of a topic in the form of a book or monograph or a collection of essays related to one another in some way.Other forms might be appropriate in particular cases. It is the responsibility of the student’s Doctoral Committee to decide what sort of a work will satisfy the requirement described above.Students should seek the advice of their advisers and doctoral committees at every stage of the work on the dissertation.

Normal Progress Toward the Degree

The criteria of normal progress toward the Ph.D. are the following:

A. The student should maintain a grade-point average of 3.33 (This average is slightly higher than the grade-point average required for the Ph.D. by the Graduate College.)No more than two I (incomplete) grades are permitted.

B. The student should find a Prelim Adviser, form a Prelim Committee, and submit a Dissertation Proposal in accordance with the schedule outlined above. (See above under “The Preliminary Examination”.)

C. By the end of six semesters, the student should have satisfied the Language Requirement and the Symbolic Logic Requirement and the Course Distribution Requirement.

D. By the end of seven semesters, the student should have completed all requirements for admission to the Third Stage of the Ph.D. Program.

E. Students in the Third Stage should meet with their Doctoral Committee at the times prescribed and fulfill all other requirements that apply in the Third Stage. (See above under “Third Stage of the Program”.)

These criteria apply to students who did not enter the program with an M.A. in philosophy from another institution, and who have fewer than two deficiencies.Students who enter the program with an MA in philosophy (and who petition to have that coursework counted toward the Ph.D. in this Department) should subtract two semesters in C and D above. For students with two or more deficiencies, one semester should be added to the number of semesters described in C and D above.

Students who are not making normal progress, as defined above, may have their financial aid suspended.

Incomplete Work

The Department expects all work assigned in courses to be completed in the term in which it has been assigned.Deferred-grades are given only in the thesis courses (Philosophy 590 and 599).Incomplete grades may be granted at the discretion of the instructor when unusual circumstances warrant granting the student the privilege of completing the work after the close of the term. In no circumstance may a student take an incomplete (I) grade from a visiting instructor who will not be teaching in the department in the following semester. Students with incomplete grades in more than 8 hours of work (2 graduate courses) will not be permitted to register for further work.

Colloquia

The Philosophy Colloquium meets frequently throughout the year for the presentation and discussion of papers presented by selected speakers, including members of the Department, visitors from outside the university, and others. The Colloquium is an important part of the graduate program in philosophy, and students are urged and expected to attend.Graduate students working on their dissertations will be encouraged to present some of their work to the Colloquium, especially during the year they plan to enter the job market.This allows them to have a trial run of papers they might use in on-campus job interviews.

Credit/No-Credit Option

Except for Dissertation Seminars and for seminars taken for 2-hours credit during the Third Stage of the program, graduate students in philosophy are not permitted to take courses under the Credit/No-Credit option to satisfy the credit requirements for advanced degrees.

Continuation of Financial Aid

Each year the Department will review the performance of each eligible student in order to determine whether financial support should be continued for that student.In order to be eligible for continued financial support, a graduate student must be in good standing in the Graduate College and must be making normal progress towards the Ph.D. degree.Teaching assistants further must show that they are capable of satisfactorily performing the duties of a teaching assistant, and must have a satisfactory record of performance of these duties, as indicated by reports of supervising teachers or by ICES scores reported to the Department.

The maximum period for which a graduate student can expect to receive financial aid for the Department is five years.A student who starts the Ph.D. program with an M.A. in philosophy from another institution, and who successfully petitions the department to have more than 12 hours (equivalent to 3 of our graduate credit courses) count toward the Ph.D. degree, can expect to receive financial aid from the Department for four years. (Exceptions may be made in the cases of students pursuing several advanced degrees – e.g., in philosophy and in law or medicine – conjointly.)This applies to all kinds of aid awarded by the Department (including fellowships and tuition-and-fee-waivers.)

Once a student has begun to receive financial aid from the Department, the Department will endeavor to maintain aid for the full period indicated (unless this assurance is expressly qualified or withheld when the yearly renewal of financial aid is made), as long as the student is making normal progress toward a degree.However, in view of budgetary uncertainties, the Department cannot guarantee continuance of financial aid for any specific period of time to all students who are deemed deserving of continued support.

In some cases, financial aid may be continued beyond the fifth year.This will be done only as budgetary conditions and the overall needs of our graduate program permit, and only as the needs of our undergraduate instructional program may warrant.Particular consideration will be given to the teaching ability of those who may be considered for appointment beyond the fifth year.

Students who receive fellowships or assistantships from sources other than those administered by the department, enabling them to pursue their studies for one or more semesters unsupported by departmentally administered funds, will normally be permitted to preserve their eligibility for support from departmental funds undiminished.Should they receive more than four semesters of such external support, their eligibility for departmental support will normally be reduced by one semester for each additional semester, beyond the fourth, during which they receive external support.Thus, someone receiving a three-year non-departmental fellowship would have four years remaining of departmental support.Exceptions will require departmental approval.

Grievance Procedures

If a graduate student has a grievance with respect to either academic work or assistantship duties, the student and the instructor or supervisor involved should meet and make every attempt to resolve the difficulty.

If they are unable to solve the problem, the following alternatives are available. Matters relating to academic work should be discussed with the student’s adviser and/or the Director of Graduate Studies.Matters relating to assistantship duties should be brought to the attention of the Departmental Head or Associate Head.

If neither of these alternatives leads to a satisfactory solution, an appeal can be made to the Departmental Grievance Committee, which shall be the Graduate Program Committee minus the Department Head. (The Departmental Grievance Committee shall elect its own Chair.The Department shall elect two alternate members to the Grievance Committee, one graduate student and one faculty member, at the beginning of the academic year to serve should any regular member be an interested party in a grievance.)A letter outlining the problem should be addressed to the Chair of the Committee, with copies going to all members of the Committee.The Committee shall meet promptly and in confidence to consider the case and report its recommendation without delay in writing to the student filing the grievance and to the Executive Committee of the Department.

If all the above efforts fail, a final appeal can be made to the Grievance Committee of the Graduate College.